"Snap Shots" & "Take Aways" from Works Consulted

Dr. Mathieu Deflem

Published Reference:

Only 15 minutes? The Social Stratification of Fame in Printed Media (2013)
 

Snap Shot:

"When individuals are decoupled from noteworthy events and are of interest in their own right, self-reinforcing processes, commemorative practices, reputation, and career structures prevent a return to obscurity. The events in which these people are involved are almost automatically of interest, and the attention they attract further increases interest, turning their name into a brand." (282)

 

 

Dr. Arnout van de Rijt

Published Reference:

Professor Goes Gaga: Teaching Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame (2013)
 

Snap Shot:

"Exemplifying the intertwined nature of sociology and society, it is under circumstances of a celebrity culture to be expected that a sociologist of fame can share some of the subject’s joys and tribulations." (127-128)

Dr. Drew Pinsky and Dr. Mark S. Young
Dr. K. Bryant Smalley, and Dr. William D. McIntosh

Published Reference:

Narcissism and Celebrity (2006)


Take Away:

"Celebrities are a highly narcissistic group, with female celebrities evincing significantly higher narcissistic tendencies than male celebrities. Musicians appear to be the least narcissistic group, and reality TV stars are the most narcissistic."

Published Reference:

The Loss of Fame: Psychological Implications (2011)
 

Snap Shot:

"In the media’s modern landscape of ever-shifting programs and personalities, losing fame is becoming nearly as common as gaining it." (385)

Published Reference:

Celebrity Culture (2010)


Snap Shot:

"The commodification of celebrity culture both fuels and responds to a market for new but readily recognisable and reassuringly familiar celebrities." (494).

Dr. Frank Furedi
Dr. Nigel Saul

Published Reference:

Is Celebrity a New Kind of Status System? (2010)


Snap Shot:

"Modern means of communication have significantly changed the patterns of day to day social interaction and the sources of our information and knowledge. […] It is more impressive to be seen on TV regularly than to have one’s name in the newspaper or be well-known in the neighborhood." (382)

Dr. Milner Murray

Published Reference:

Celebrity Ancient and Modern (2010)


Snap Shot:

"Human nature being what it is, there surely have always been people afflicted with a pathological desire for attention. A striking example of this involves an arsonist called Herostratus, who set fire to the great temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey in 348 BCE for no better reason, as he later confessed under torture, than being driven by an insatiable appetite for celebrity." (484-485)

Dr. Robert Garland

Published Reference:

Chivalry and the Birth of Celebrity (2011)


Snap Shot:

"Fame describes ‘reputation,’ ‘renown’ or ‘good report’; it is associated with recognition of an achievement beyond time or place, the assurance that a person’s name will live on, the knowledge that he or she will have a place in history. Celebrity, however, is associated with a certain glitziness which underlies and informs a relationship between the celebrity and an admiring audience." (21-22)

Published Reference:

Toward Understanding the Fame Game: The Effect of Mortality Salience on the Appeal of Fame (2010)


Snap Shot:

"...the best we can hope for is to direct these urges for fame and celebrity fandom toward prosocial activities that contribute to the alleviation of human suffering and enrichment of people’s lives." (14)

Published Reference:

Supernovas: The Dialectic of Celebrity in Society (2010)


Snap Shot:

"A celebrity’s life is molded—if it is not destroyed—by an ongoing give and take between free actions, unruly passions, and the needs and aspirations, hopes and fears of a public that is itself self-governed or ill-governed, a mob, a market, a voter base, a fan base—the people." (515)

Dr. Jeff Greenberg
Dr. Lenn E. Goodman

Published Reference:

Being a Celebrity: A Phenomenology of Fame (2009)


Snap Shot:

"Understanding the experiential world of celebrities and the challenges of fame can help those who themselves seek leadership positions in politics, media, sports, law, or business, among other areas, prepare to confront the overwhelming sensation of recognition in “the sea of eyes.” (208)

Published Reference:

Implicit Theories of a Desire for Fame. (2008)


Snap Shot:

"Fame interest comprises six factors: intensity, vulnerability, celebrity life-style, drive, perceived suitability, and altruistic." (428)

Dr. Donna Rockwell and Dr. David C. Giles
Dr. John Maltby

Published Reference:

The Psychological Consequences of Fame: Three Tests of the Self-Consciousness Hypothesis (1997)


Take Away:

Author hypothesizes that those aspiring to become a celebrity are at greater-than-normal risk for self-abusive behaviors, because for celebrities, the experience of self-consciousness is especially unpleasant.

Published Reference:

Craving the Spotlight: Buddhism, Narcissism, and the Desire for Fame (2006)


Snap Shot:

"With the expansive audiences that mediums such as the internet, television, and movies reach, fame is easier to achieve, and in some ways, less meaningful than it was in the past." (216)

Dr. Mark Schaller
Dr. Elizabeth Nutt Williams and Karen L. Celedonia
  • Celedonia, Karen L., and Elizabeth Nutt Williams. “Craving the Spotlight: Buddhism, Narcissism, and the Desire for Fame.” The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology 38.2 (2006): 216-224. Print.

  • Deflem, Mathieu. “Professor Goes Gaga: Teaching Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame.” American Sociologist 44.2 (2013): 117-131. Print.

  • Furedi, Frank. “Celebrity Culture.” Society 47.6 (2010): 493-497. Print.

  • Garland, Robert. “Celebrity Ancient and Modern.” Society 47.6 (2010): 484-488. Print.

  • Goodman, Lenn E. “Supernovas: The Dialectic of Celebrity in Society.” Society 47.6 (2010): 510-515. Print.

  • Greenberg, Jeff, et al. “Toward Understanding the Fame Game: The Effect of Mortality Salience on the Appeal of Fame.” Self & Identify 9.1 (2010): 1-18. Print.

  • Maltby, John. “An interest in fame: Confirming the measurement and empirical conceptualization of fame interest.” British Journal of Psychology 101.3 (2010): 411-432. Print.

  • Maltby, John, et al. “Implicit theories of a desire for fame.” British Journal of Psychology 99.2 (2008): 279-292. Print.

  • Milner, Murray. “Is Celebrity a New Kind of Status System?” Society 47.5 (2010): 379-387. Print.

  • Rockwell, Donna, and David C. Giles. “Being a Celebrity: A Phenomenology of Fame.” Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40.2 (2009): 178-210. Print.

  • Saul, Nigel. “Chivalry and the Birth of Celebrity.” History Today 61.6 (2011): 20-25. Print.

  • Schaller, Mark. “The Psychological Consequences of Fame: Three Tests of the Self-Consciousness Hypothesis.” Journal of Personality 65.2 (1997): 291-309. Print.

  • Simkin, M. V., and V. P. Roychowdhury. “A mathematical theory of fame.” Journal of Statistical Physics 151.1-2 (2013): 319-328. Print.

  • Smalley, K. Bryant, and William D. McIntosh. “The Loss of Fame: Psychological Implications.” The Journal of Popular Culture 44.2 (2011): 385-397. Print.

  • Uhls, Yalda T., and Patricia M. Greenfield. “The Rise of Fame: An Historical Content Analysis.” Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace 5.1 (2011). Web. 19 July 2013.

  • van de Rijt, Arnout, et al. “Only 15 minutes? The Social Stratification of Fame in Printed Media.” American Sociological Review 78.2 (2013): 266-289. Print.

  • Young, S. Mark, and Drew Pinsky. “Narcissism and celebrity.” Journal of Research in Personality 40.6 (2006): 463-471. Print.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY IN DEVELOPMENT

© 2020 by Brandon Chicotsky.    All rights reserved.

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